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114 posts categorized "Articles"

04 March 2010

One man's scotch whisky passion (Wine Enthusiast - 1 December 2009)

We-cover An article about Claive Vidiz's incredible 3400+ bottle scotch whisky collection - and how he amassed it - appears in the 1 December 2009 issue of Wine Enthusiast magazine.  The collection is now on display at the Scotch Whisky Experience attraction in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The issue is available in most major bookstores and newsstands.

Military experts discuss the attack at Fort Hood (The Washington Post - 6 November 2009)

Washpostlogo After the attacks at Fort Hood, the Washington Post reached out and asked if I'd give my point of view as a military spouse on what occurred for the Topic A section.

Excerpt:

As details about the shootings streamed across the Web, I noticed how the nature of the messages changed over time. Initially, some military friends lamented that they no longer felt safe on Army posts. But once Maj. Nidal Hasan was identified as the lone gunman, many focused on his name, rank and faith. The fear that had been so palpable diminished. Few of the messages were explicit -- one simply said, "A single shooter and a Muslim?!" But their meaning was clear -- that Hasan's Islamic faith explained what had previously been an unfathomable act of violence...

(To read the rest of the op-ed, click here).

Music training linked to better understanding of speech (The Dana Foundation Website - 30 October 2009)

Dana_logo New research suggests that music education may help individuals understand speech better - and may lead to new treatments for different speech-related disorders.

Excerpt:

French author Victor Hugo once wrote, “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and cannot remain silent.” A new study suggests that musical skills can also help people understand spoken words buried in a noisy cacophony. This ability may help explain why music training seems to help some people with other forms of learning and could eventually lead to new therapies for children with autism and older people with hearing difficulty...

(To read the rest of this article, click here). 

Alzheimer's drugs may help treat brain injuries (The Dana Foundation Website - 11 September 2009)

Dana_logo How might Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injuries be related?  I discuss that in this article for the Dana Foundation Website.

Excerpt:

For decades, scientists have postulated a link between traumatic brain injuries and an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease down the line. Now neuroscientists have uncovered a possible mechanism the two conditions shares—and identified a class of Alzheimer’s drugs in testing that may also help minimize the damage that occurs in TBI cases...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Oakland County, Michigan shares notification service with local cities (Government Technology - 9 November 2009)

Govtech0808 An article about how a county in Michigan is sharing an online government with all of its cities for free is in Government Technology magazine.

Excerpt:

When the H1N1 "swine" flu epidemic broke loose in late April 2009, Americans clamored for information about the disease and its potential impact in their communities. Many local governments turned to their own Web sites and other means of digital communication to disseminate information...

(To read the rest of the story, click here).


17 August 2009

New drug target reduces seizures in mice (The Dana Foundation Website - 12 August 2009)

Dana A neuroscientist at Carnegie Mellon University has stumbled on a neuronal membrane channel that may shows promise as a therapeutic target to control epileptic seizures.

Excerpt:

Despite a variety of available drug treatments, many people who have epilepsy still are unable to control their seizures with medication. New research suggests a molecular mechanism that seems to “reset” neurons may and offer another avenue for treatment...

(To read the rest of the article, click here). 

Immune gene evolution may be driven by parasites (The Dana Foundation Website - 22 July 2009)

Dana Helminthes, or parasitic worms, may have helped shape the human immune system.  And that symbiotic relationship may be responsible for the rise of auto-immune disorders in developed countries.

Excerpt:

Soon after I brought my newborn son home from the hospital, my grandmother admonished me not to bathe him too often. If babies are too clean, they are more likely to get sick, she said. Now researchers are finding there may be something to that folk wisdom. A population genetics study published in the June 8 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine suggests that parasites have helped shape the human immune system—and that a lack of exposure to helminthes, or worms, may account for rising rates of autoimmune disorders such as irritable bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

How stress affects the brain may depend on age (The Dana Foundation Website - 12 June 2009)

Dana It's long been known that stress affects the brain.  But new research suggests that at what age you experience that stress may determine what kind of impact it has. 

Excerpt:

Researchers have long known that chronic stress can harm the brain. In particular, hormones called glucocorticoids, released by the adrenal gland in response to stress, have been linked to depression, reduced hippocampal volume and learning and memory deficits in some people. But new research suggests chronic stress alone does not cause the damage—instead, the stage of life in which one experiences that stress may be the key to understanding its potential lasting and detrimental effects...

(To read the rest of this article, click here).

Anesthesia in young children may be linked to later learning disabilities (The Dana Foundation Website - 3 June 2009)

Dana Scientists are now learning that the use of anesthesia in young children is correlated with learning disabilities later in life.  A piece discussing these findings appears on the Dana Foundation Website. 

Excerpt:

Each year, hundreds of thousands of children 3 years of age and under are anesthetized during surgeries and other common medical procedures and tests. Doctors believed that the risk of using anesthetics in infants and toddlers was minimal. But recent scientific studies, both in animals and humans, suggest that there may be a relationship between the use of anesthesia in young children and later cognitive deficits...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Autism researchers explore genetic and environmental risk factors (The Dana Foundation Website - 14 April 2009)

Dana An article about how scientists are trying to put both the genetic and environmental pieces of Autism's puzzle together appears on the Dana Foundation's Website.

Excerpt:

Although scientists diligently seek the genetic underpinnings of autism, the spectral nature of the disorder has made it difficult to find a “smoking gun” gene. Some researchers hope that their research into the role of environmental risk factors will help explain the disorder’s causes...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

12 March 2009

Research suggests strong role for Vitamin D (The Dana Foundation Website - 9 March 2009)

Dana_logo Low Vitamin D levels have been linked to a variety of health problems in the past few years.  New genetic research suggests that Vitamin D may play a much better role in the development and maintenance of the immune system than ever before imagined.

Excerpt:

Vitamin D, a micronutrient we absorb from the sun’s rays, has long been known to be beneficial to bone health, preventing childhood diseases such as the bone-softening rickets. But new research suggests that the micronutrient’s reach may be much deeper—it may play a pivotal role in the development and maintenance of the human immune system...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Search widens for causes of psychiatric disorder (The Dana Foundation Website - 25 February 2009)

Dana_logo An emerging discipline, epigenetics, is offering researchers ways to understand more about how genes and the environment interact in the development of psychiatric disorders.

Excerpt:

Despite the recent leaps in our knowledge concerning the human genome, research in this area has not yet provided the kind of concrete answers that physicians and their patients had long hoped for. An emerging discipline, epigenetics, may—and may offer new directions for research as well as more targeted therapies for treatment...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

10 March 2009

Deeper understanding of the blood-brain barrier may lead to targeted treatments (The Dana Foundation Website - 9 February 2009)

Dana_logoAn article about advances in understanding how the blood-brain barrier works may provide clinicians hope for better treatments for certain disorders. 

Excerpt:

 Several new studies of the blood-brain barrier may pave the way for better treatments of certain cancers and inflammatory brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke.

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a network of specialized blood vessels that both transports nutrients into the neural tissue from the bloodstream and blocks potentially harmful substances...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

12 November 2008

Study links arteries to immune function (The Dana Foundation Web Site - 12 November 2008)

Dana_logo New research suggests that arteries do much more than just transport blood through the body.  A piece on the Dana Foundation Web site discusses new work that demonstrates their role in immune function.

Excerpt:

Arteries, the large blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart and to the rest of the body, may play a far more important role in immune response than previously thought, suggests a new study by researchers at Emory University...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

07 November 2008

Location may make a difference in flu vaccination (The Dana Foundation Web Site - 6 November 2008)

Dana_logo A study published by scientists at the University of Melbourne suggest that where one receives an influenza vaccination may influence how effective it is.  An article about the study and its implications appears in the News and Features section of the Dana Foundation Web site.

Excerpt:

In many areas of medicine, how effective a treatment is depends on whether it is directly applied to the area of injury or infection. For example, bandaging the shoulder when your wrist is broken may not provide the relief desired...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

04 November 2008

Four winter pregnancy worries - and how to deal (American Baby - November 2008)

345_ABNov08 Worried about your winter pregnancy?  I look at four worries about being pregnant during the wintertime for an article in the November 2008 American Baby.

Excerpt:

Being pregnant in winter may seem like a nuisance, but there are actually plenty of upsides to expecting once the temperatures plunge. Here are four reasons to stop worrying and start embracing your cold-weather pregnancy...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Brain responds quickly to faces (BrainWork - November/December 2008)

Cvr_sm_brainwork An article about recent discoveries in how we interpret facial expressions is in the November/December issue of BrainWork, the Dana Foundation's neuroscience newsletter.

Excerpt:

Approaching the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth (in January 2009), the bulk of studies concerning facial expressions support his premise that facial expressions for emotions such as happiness, sadness and anger are universal across races and cultures. With new methods in cognitive psychology and neuroscience, researchers are extending our understanding of just what facial expressions convey and how we interpret them...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Green movement pushes more companies toward sustainable packaging (Nutritional Outlook - October 2008)

NO0810_cover An article about the increasing popularity of sustainable packing appears in the October 2008 issue of Nutritional Outlook.

Excerpt:

There seems to be no doubt about it: green products and practices are in. What started as a small ecotrend has snowballed into a national movement. In fact, a recent market research survey by AMP Agency (Chicago) found that 90% of more than 3000 participants aged 18–49 believe that environmental responsibility is important enough to modify their buying behaviors. What's more, those respondents stated that they hold corporations primarily accountable for the environmental impact of their goods and processes. The AMP study is not the only one. Other surveys by organizations like EcoPulse (Knoxville, TN), Packaging Digest magazine, and the Nielsen Co. (New York City) suggest that the green movement is no mere fad...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

20 October 2008

Sex differences offer new insight into psychiatric disorders (The Dana Foundation Web Site - 20 October 2008)

Dana_logo An article about how the study of sex differences is changing the field of neuroscience appears on the Dana Foundation's Web site. 

Excerpt:

When Carolyn Schapper, 35, a military intelligence soldier, returned from a one-year Iraq deployment, she started experiencing symptoms including jumpiness, a short temper and nightmares. Six months after she returned to the United States, she realized that those symptoms might be more than simple readjustment issues...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

16 September 2008

Stevia products poised to transform beverage market (Nutritional Outlook - September 2008)

Nutriout200809_0001 An article on the up-and-coming sweetener, Stevia, is the September 2008 cover story for Nutritional Outlook magazine.

Excerpt:

In the 2007 Health & Wellness Trends Database Report, the Natural Marketing Institute revealed that U.S. retail sales of health and wellness products topped $100 billion last year.  But that dollar figure represents more than just sales -- it marks a dramatic paradigm shift in the food and beverage industry, with top manufacturers now looking to develop ingredients and products to sate consumer demand for natural fare.  And with the sale of carbonated beverages steadily dropping as consumers choose water or juice over their beloved soda pop, beverage companies are looking for ways to make their iconic drinks palatable to a more health-conscious population...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Novel ingredients target joint health (Nutritional Outlook - September 2008)

Nutriout200809_0001 An article about ingredients that may soon make up your arthritis relief supplements appears in the September 2008 issue of Nutritional Outlook.

Excerpt:

Keeping joints healthy is often easier said than done.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that one in five adults in the United States has some doctor-diagnosed form of arthritic disease, the most common joint-related health crisis...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

08 August 2008

Computational models reveal new insights in neuroscience (The Dana Foundation Website - 6 August 2008)

Dana_logo Neural networks are being used increasingly to inform neuroscience.  An article about ways they can be used to test hypotheses appears on the Dana Foundation website.

Excerpt:

Neuroscientists have learned a great deal about how the brain works, from the molecular to the functional level, in the past few decades. But that knowledge has brought other questions, including a big one: How can researchers, often trained in a particular neuroscience discipline, understand and use all that data to develop the right kind of hypotheses to test?

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

03 August 2008

RFID helps Florida State Attorney track case files (Government Technology - August 2008)

Govtech0808( An article about the way a Florida State Attorney's office is using RFID to tackle case file management appears in the August 2008 issue of Government Technology magazine.

Excerpt:

In the Florida Office of the State Attorney's 15th Judicial Circuit in Palm Beach County, an attorney needs to find a file that's pertinent to a case she'll be prosecuting in court later that day. It can't be found in any of the likely places, and the attorney needs it immediately. A year ago, that need would have precipitated bedlam in the office...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Down on the dollar (Successful Meetings - August 2008)

Successfulmeetings An article about how meeting planners can best stretch the dollar when planning events overseas appears in the August 2008 issue of Successful Meetings magazine.

Excerpt:

The trusty greenback has Americans a little blue when they travel to Europe these days.  They aren't the only ones missing the days of a stronger U.S. currency, either, as many conference venues across Europe and the United Kingdom this year are experiencing a loss of business from American-based organizations...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

04 July 2008

Organic market primed for growth (Nutritional Outlook - June 2008)

Nutrioutjune08_0001 A piece about the organic ingredients market appears in the June 2008 issue of Nutritional Outlook magazine.

Excerpt:

Last year, Information Resources Inc. (IRI; Chicago) revealed a significant trend in its annual New Product Pacesetters report.  The market research company found that many of the most successful new brands of 2007 included those with a health and wellness bent.  In fact, consumer demand for health and wellness consumer packaged goods (CPG) is dramatically increasing.  Now more than ever, consumers are looking for products that can help them gain and maintain optimal health.  And with that trend, the demand for a particular type of CPG eco-brand - organic - is also rising...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

02 July 2008

Genetic study gives new insight into schizophrenia (The Dana Foundation Website - 2 July 2008)

Dana_logo An article about how random genetic mutations may be at the root of schizophrenia appears on the Dana Foundation's website. 

Excerpt:

A recent study by researchers at the University of Washington and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories suggests that random errors in the genome, many of them targeting glutamate pathways, may contribute to schizophrenia. The results have potential implications for how scientists should study the neurobiological effects behind the disorder as well as how they approach the design of new drug and other interventions...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

19 May 2008

The unexpected dependent: When retirement is not for you alone (AARP Bulletin Today - 19 May 2008)

Aarpbul_logo_2
Three articles about the potential retirement consequences of an unexpected dependent appear on the AARP Bulletin Today website.

Excerpt:

Teresa Boardman, 49, and Jack Boardman, 59, of St. Paul, Minn., had a plan. When Jack turned 65, he would retire from his job in the parts department of a car dealership, and Teresa would continue working for a few more years as a self-employed real estate agent. Now they’re reconsidering those plans: Their daughter Sarah, 27, has moved back home while she pursues her graduate degree...

(To see the rest of the article, click here, with sidebar information here and here).

Superfoods help heart health (Nutritional Outlook - April 2008)

No0803_coverA story about superfoods and how their consumption can benefit cardiovascular health appears in the April 2008 issue of Nutritional Outlook.

Excerpt:

You can hardly open a magazine or newspaper these days without reading about so-called superfoods.  Exotic foods such as pomegranate, acai, goji, mangosteen and spirulina, as well as more every-day offerings such as blueberry and cranberry, are all being touted as foods that can help prevent disease and slow down the aging process.  But is there more to these foods than hype?  Anecdotal and preliminary scientific evidence point to yes -- including indications that they can help prevent cardiovascular disease, a leading killer of individuals over 45 years of age.  And those findings are spurring new markets and vehicles to get superfoods and their components out to consumers...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

11 May 2008

When your toddler is a late talker (Parenting - May 2008)

Par_sub_char_mod_02An article about toddlers and delayed speech appears in the May 2008 issue of Parenting Magazine. 

Excerpt:

If your toddler seems behind in speech and language, people often try to offer up "helpful" advice. Careful -- they may pass on misinformation. The facts about some things you might hear...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

01 May 2008

What to do when your parent is in debt (AARP Bulletin Today - April 2008)

Aarpbul_logo_2An article about what to do when you find that your elderly parent is in debt appears on the AARP Bulletin Today website.

Excerpt:

Until our weeklong visit, my mother and I had no idea that things had gotten so bad for her mother.

Nothing could have prepared us for the telephone calls that began each day at 6 a.m. and sometimes continued late into the evening. My grandmother refused to pick up the phone. And when my mother or I answered, we found tenacious collections agents on the other end who were all too happy to berate us instead. We had no idea how long my grandmother had been living with the calls or how much debt had caused them to start...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

29 April 2008

The physiology of sleep (The Dana Foundation Website - 28 April 2008)

Dana_logo An article that discusses new findings that are changing the way that neuroscientists are thinking about sleep appears on the Dana Foundation website. 

Excerpt:

Most animals sleep—mammals, reptiles, even fruit flies. And while plenty of behavioral studies show the restorative effects of sleep and the detrimental cognitive effects to vigilance and short-term memory tasks when it is withheld, it has not been clear exactly why we must periodically lose consciousness in this way. But some recent studies examining its neurobiological mechanisms have led to new hypotheses about sleep...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

26 February 2008

School tracking system helps New Mexico gauge school performance (Government Technology - March 2008)

Govtechlogo_2An article on New Mexico's statewide student performance accountability system appears in the March 2008 issue of Government Technology magazine.

Excerpt:

A focal point requirement of the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), federal legislation aimed at improving U.S. primary and secondary schools performance, was to implement accountability systems that analyze student and educator data, and report those results to the U.S. Department of Education. These reporting systems were heralded as an effective way to help state departments of education collect statistics to assess teacher proficiency and student progress...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

18 February 2008

Video devices further research into out-of-body experiences (BrainWork - January/February 2008)

Cvr_sm_brainworkWhat is happening in the brain during out-of-body experiences?  In an article for the January/February 2008 issue of BrainWork, I spoke with two labs who are examining exactly this by trying to induce such experiences.

Excerpt:

In recent years, neuroscientists have examined the phenomenon of out-of-body experiences to better understand how the brain integrates sensory information to form the idea of self and the idea that the self is localized within the body. New research furthers these findings by using special displays to induce the illusion of an out-of-body experience in normal participants...

(To read the entire article, click here).

17 February 2008

Tips for immigrants building a U.S. credit history (CreditCards.com - February 2008)

Creditcardslogo_2An article about establishing credit when emigrating to the United States appears on the CreditCards.com website. 

Excerpt:

America lures many who dream of living better. But when immigrants arrive, their credit histories rarely make the trip.

Jeroen Baert, 39, moved to Atlanta from the Netherlands, where he had excellent credit.  When he opened a bank account with a large national bank in the United States, he was stunned that the institution was unwilling to give him a debit card...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

01 February 2008

Rare Epilepsy Shines New Light on Glucose and the Brain (The Dana Foundation Website - 1 February 2008)

DanaAn article about how glucose accumulation in neurons is at the root of a rare form of epilepsy called Lafora disease appears on the Dana Foundation website.

Excerpt:

Researchers in Spain studying a rare form of epilepsy have discovered that the metabolic mechanisms that could give neurons energy may also play a role in neurodegenerative diseases.

Lafora disease is an extremely rare and lethal type of genetic epilepsy that affects adolescents. “It is quite devastating,” says Joan J. Guinovart, director of Barcelona’s Institute for Research in Biomedicine and a professor at the University of Barcelona. “Children are normal until they are about 10 years old and then they start having seizures. From there, the disease evolves very rapidly.” About 200 people currently have Lafora disease and most die from six to ten years after the first symptoms are observed...

(To read the rest of the article, please click here).

12 January 2008

Therapy restores field of vision (Dana Foundation Website - 31 December 2007)

DanaAn article about visual restoration therapy (VRT) appears in the News section of the Dana Foundation website.

Excerpt:

In 2005, Robert Hobbs suffered a stroke that blocked blood flow to parts of his brain and affected his speech, memory and vision.

“Mostly it was an effect on my field of vision,” says Hobbs, 66, of Miami Springs, Fla. “Almost every adult has taken a vision field test, where you stare at a focal point on a machine and respond to lights coming up in your periphery. I couldn’t see the lights on either side, or at least couldn’t see very many of them.” This loss also took away Hobbs’ reading ability, which meant he had to leave his job as a shift supervisor at an Associated Press news bureau...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

05 December 2007

Picture Perfect (Parenting - December 2007)

Parenting_90wA short Ages+Stages piece on getting your toddler to smile pretty for professional photos appears in the December 2007 issue of Parenting.

Excerpt:

When Cindy D'Erasmo of New Rochelle, NY, took her daughter, Isabella, to the photographer on her first birthday, she was in for an unpleasant surprise. Though Isabella had happily cooperated in the past, this time she cried and refused to pose until her mother handed her some Cheerios — visible in the finished photo...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

12 November 2007

Moving abroad? Your credit history may not follow (CreditCards.com - November 2007)

Creditcardslogo_2An article about whether your credit history follows if you move internationally appears on the CreditCards.com website. 

Excerpt:

As technology advances in the banking and credit communities, you'd think something as simple as a credit rating should be readily available to banks, credit institutions and lenders outside of the United States...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

10 November 2007

Through a glass, sharply (Government Health IT - November 2007)

Ghit2"Through a glass, sharply," an article about transparency policy and how it can be effectively used in the healthcare information technology realm, appears in the November issue of Government Health IT magazine.

Excerpt:

Many lawmakers and academics believe that the more information people have about the creation and implementation of public policies, the more effective those policies will be. But such efforts at transparency require a thoughtful approach...

05 November 2007

Le Shopping: Main-hattan (Delta Sky - November 2007)

Delta_november An article about the Zeil, Frankfurt's pedestrian shopping area, appears in this month's issue of Delta Sky magazine.

Excerpt:

Not only is Frankfurt Germany’s financial center, the city also boasts a uniquely non-European skyline that might make you wonder if you aren’t standing on the New York side of the Atlantic...

10 September 2007

Discovering the "face" of memory (The Dana Foundation News and Features - 10 September 2007)

DanaAn article about recent research that demonstrated how learning and memory physically alters the size of synapses in the brain appears in the News and Features section of the Dana Foundation website.

Excerpt:

For more than a century, great minds in psychology, medicine and philosophy have searched for the stuff of which memories are made. Earlier this year, an interdisciplinary research team led by Gary Lynch, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the University of California, Irvine, may have discovered physical evidence of the neurobiological basis of a memory...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

Brew Pup—The face that launched a thousand bottles (The Bark - Issue #44, September/October 2007)

Bark44_cov_120x150"Brew Pup—The face that launched a thousand bottles," an article about Smuttynose Brewery's famous pin-up dog, Olive, appears in Issue #44, September/October 2007, of the Bark

The issue is available at Barnes and Noble Booksellers and other newsstands this month.

05 September 2007

Roads to Recovery (Government Health IT - 10 September 2007)

Ghit_magAn article on the DoD and VA's plans to share medical records appears in Government Health IT.

Excerpt:

After a series of news reports in March about conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and other government health care facilities, President Bush convened a presidential commission to examine why injured service members and veterans are not receiving proper care...

04 September 2007

Keeping Baby Boomers Healthier Longer (Nutritional Outlook - July/August 2007)

No_cover An article on baby boomer health entitled, "Keeping Baby Boomers Healthier Longer" appeared in the July/August 2007 issue of Nutritional Outlook, a trade magazine for the dietary supplement and healthy food and beverage industry.

Excerpt:

In a recent study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), researchers at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) found that Americans in their mid-50s reported themselves to be in poorer health and in more pain than those approaching retirement in previous generations. Given the fact that members of the so-called baby boomer set made up more than 20% of the United States population in 2000, their increased health issues are not only a concern to economists and healthcare providers looking to quantify the resources needed to handle the aging-related concerns of this large population, but also to friends and family members who would like to see them live longer, higher-quality lives...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

18 July 2007

Ingredients May Affect Brain Health (BrainWork - July/August 2007)

Cvr_sm_brainwork_2An article about how polyphenols can work in a neuroprotective fashion appears in the July/August edition of BrainWork.

Excerpt:

Compounds inherent in berries, pomegranate juice, wine and green tea have all been cited as having the potential to help people live longer and better. New research is revealing how these compounds—called polyphenols—work, not only as anti-oxidants but also in a neuroprotective capacity in the brain...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

02 July 2007

Getting What You Pay For (Healthcare Informatics - July 2007)

Hci_july2007_coverAn article about a recent PriceWaterhouseCoopers report on the economics of information technology in healthcare appears in the July issue of Healthcare Informatics.

Excerpt:

For the past two years, New York City-based PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC), in partnership with the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has examined key business data from nearly 2,000 hospitals. In doing so, the organization has created a rigorous macroeconomic model of how information technology (IT) investments affect hospital operating costs and performance...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

18 June 2007

Lessons from battlefield EMR adoption can be applied elsewhere (Digital Healthcare and Productivity - 12 June 2007)

An article about how lessons learned from the Medical Communications for Combat Casualty Care (MC4) project can be applied to emergency departments is now up on the Digital Healthcare and Productivity website. 

Excerpt:

The unpredictable environment of emergency departments makes them excellent candidates for use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems to reduce patient errors and to improve quality of care. But clinical personnel often resist the introduction of new and complicated IT solutions, at least in part, because the process disrupts traditional workflows and requires additional training for staffs that are already time-constrained...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

23 May 2007

Cerebral Malaria, a Wily Foe (Cerebrum - May 2007)

Cerebrumhead A piece on recent strides in cerebral malaria research, "Cerebral Malaria, a Wily Foe" appears in the online Dana Foundation journal, Cerebrum. 

Excerpt:

Halima, a three-year-old girl, was brought to the hospital in Kenya after running a fever for almost two days.  At first, the fever seemed nothing to be particularly concerned about, so Halima’s mother gave her paracetamol (acetaminophen) to bring down her temperature and left her in the care of an older sister while she went out to work on the farm. But when she returned a few hours later, she was unable to wake her child. She shook her gently and Halima’s eyes opened, but the girl stared blankly ahead, unable to make eye contact.  Her sister told their mother that Halima had had a convulsion earlier, her arms and legs jerking uncontrollably for several minutes before her body went limp. It was then that the mother began the arduous four-hour trek to the hospital for treatment...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

09 May 2007

A brain at rest tends to stay...in motion (BrainWork - May 2007)

Cvr_sm_brainworkAn article about the "default network," or resting states of the brain is up in the May 2007 issue of BrainWork. 

Excerpt:

What is the brain doing when it is being asked to do nothing in particular?

During the past five years, Marcus Raichle and his team at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have looked at that question. While working on other neuroimaging studies, Raichle noticed an interesting trend in brain activation when experimental participants began a cognitive task...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).

28 March 2007

Infection Protection (Healthcare Informatics - March 2007)

032007An article on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network system appears in the March 2007 issue of Healthcare Informatics.

Excerpt:

Nosocomial infections, or infections acquired by patients during hospitalization, have long been of concern to healthcare providers. The rise of antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals, however, has resulted in pushes for compulsory reporting and control measures.

As such, several states, including New York, Tennessee, and Vermont, among others, have passed legislation mandating the reporting of healthcare-associated infection rates. Other states are in the process of considering similar laws...

(To read the rest of the article, click here).